How to fix common issues with web forms

We know many of you are using GetResponse web form builder to effectively manage sign ups on your websites. To help you with some frequently asked questions, here’s a short post on the most common issues you might experience and how to easily solve them.




HTML vs. JavaScript – which one works best?

At GetResponse, we recommend embedding your sign up forms using JavaScript. This way any further changes you might want to make to your form will be made in one and one place only – the GetResponse panel. Plus, when you use JavaScript, each change will automatically appear on your website.


This will save you precious time, making the management of your web forms much easier. Plus, you won’t have to mess with the web form code on your website.


On the other hand, using HTML will allow you to adjust the form to your individual needs, if you like tampering with the code, of course. In this case though, each change in your sign up form’s HTML code will require an additional change in the actual web form on your website.


The reason we recommend JavaScript is you can do it all in one step, not two or three.


Tip: If you want to center your web form, you can’t do that within the form itself. You will need to build a separate block element with suitable styles.



A few common web form errors (and how to fix them)

If your web form doesn’t display correctly on your website, there might be a couple of problems causing it.


  • The most popular one is because your website does not comply with W3C standards. These are standards set to unify the operation of various web browsers, such as Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari etc..


The source of most inconsistencies in the way websites are displayed in web browsers is the lack of the document type   declaration, which must always be exact.


What does this mean?


Well, for example when there’s no doctype declaration, Internet Explorer will get into a so called Quirks Mode. In other   words, the browser will try to maintain compatibility with web pages designed for older browser versions, causing   differences in the way HTML elements are interpreted and displayed.


In plain English, this means your website might not exactly look the way you wanted it to.


Tip: The recommended document type is XHTML 1.0 Strict.


The freedom in which HTML elements can be combined with CSS styles might also cause their wrong interpretation by web  browsers. The CSS styles of the web form can be overwritten with the styles in the code of your website.

 


  • Another frequent problem is what customers report as “missing letters”. In fact these are not errors. When a website is loaded, some time is needed for all the script to take effect. Sometimes potential subscribers start filling out the form before the code is fully loaded.


We’re here to help you out

If your web form is not displaying correctly, or not the way you want it to, contact our support, and we can fix it. What we’ll do is add a so-called “reset style”, and we’re constantly working on developing these.


If your web form is embedded using JavaScript, the changes in reset styles will take effect automatically, while if you’re using HTML, you will need to save the form in your GetResponse account again and then paste the new code on your website or fan page.


Tip: If your web form was created before 1 October 2010 and you’re using the HTML code, you may experience some additional problems with the way it is displayed. If this happens, we recommend pasting the HTML code of your web form once again on your website – this should solve all the problems.



We hope this post has answered your questions regarding web form issues. If you have any comments, do let us know. And don’t forget to contact our Support team if you need assistance with your GetResponse account.

  • http://www.Electric-Reviews.org Mark Demers

    The List , Web forms and e-mail marketing is where i seem to get stuck. Marketers say it`s a necessary evil and that you can`t make any serious money without doing this.
    I tried setting up a campaign but i just run out of energy doing this and juggling to keep my 2 websites current.
    Perhaps after the holidays i will tackle this . It really is a big job to set up all your autoresponder messages prior to starting a campaign.

    Nice post and thanks for the heads up about which way is better – XHTML , not only that but i appreciate when a website will tell you they have problems and try to offer you a solution to fix it.(Good Work)

    Have a Great Day !

  • Karolina Stefanowicz

    Thanks Mark, we’re certainly glad this helps.

  • dave

    How can you set the getresponsebox to appear upon Exit or closing the tab/window???

  • Karolina Stefanowicz

    Hi Dave,
    At the moment this is not possible, I’m afraid. but thanks for the suggestion – we’ll forward it to our developers.
    Cheers.

  • KatarzynaPietka

    Hi Lonneke, please let me know if you’re using the same email address for GetResponse. If not, could you send me your GetResponse email address? Thanks! ^KP

  • Guest

    I’m using the 30 day free trial and trying to test the web form on a wordpress site in a widget. I have tried both the WordPress widget as well as the javascript AND html in a text/html widget box.

    WordPress widget doesn’t do anything. HTML widget just displays an error (which seems to be what the code of that widget does…)

    Is this disabled while in free trial so I can’t test? Or is there something wrong with the form I’ve set up?

  • KatarzynaPietka

    Hello, I’ll help you solve this issue as soon as possible. Can you send me your email account address to katarzyna.pietka@implix.com ? Thanks! ^KP

  • http://theartofevents.org Seun Solaja

    I created a form and it doesn’t centre on my page. How do I tweak this anomaly?

  • Karolina Kurcwald

    Hi Seun, Could you please contact our Support team directly about this? They’ll be able to a look at the form to see what could be the problem. Thanks! http://app.getresponse.com/support.html